Los Angeles History

Los Angeles History


The first European to see Southern California in 1542 was Jua Cabrillo, who described it as ‘The valley of the smokes’, created by the Tongva bonfires. In 1769, when the Spanish occupation of California began, an exploratory expedition of more than 60 Spanish settlers travelling from Mexico, led by Gaspar de Portola, founded a pueblo along a healthy river and named it ‘ Our Lady, Queen of Angels’, moved north through the area now known as Los Angeles. The group camped by a river where the soil was fertile and availability of water for irrigation impressed members of the party, especially Father Juan Crespi, who saw the location as having all the requirements for a large settlement. In the 1770s, Franciscan missionaries led by Fr. Junipero Serra settled across California, and established missions at San Fernando and San Gabriel.

The Pobloadores, a group of 44 people comprising of 11 families with 11 men, 11 women, and 22 children, led by Captain Rivera Y Moncada, established a community on September 4, 1781, in the area discovered by Portola. They named it El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reyna de Los Angeles de Porciuncula, after the nearby river, which over time was known as the ‘City of Angels’, and it was on April 4, 1850, that it became the City of Los Angeles.

The Southern Pacific railroad came in from San Francisco in 1872, bringing Los Angeles in touch with the rest of California and the nation, and a few years later Southern California became a large farming centre, with manufacturing and industry just starting. The east coast filmmakers landed in Hollywood in 1900s, with which the studios flourished and Los Angeles became the capital of the entertainment industry. The Olympics were organized and hosted by the city in 1932 and the region played an important role in World War II, as the factories within the region produced weaponry, airplanes, and machinery for the war.

The city diversified in the 1960s and 1970s with the arriving of overseas immigrants, mainly from Asia and Middle East. Most of the 1990s was spent in recession, though the focus was to improve and reform the government and the way of life. Today, Los Angeles has grown into one of the most diverse communities in the world, and any visitor to its broad dusty plain, resting between the San Gabriel Mountains and the Pacific, would note that the reluctance to merge always gives way to the desire to travel along the great roadways of Los Angeles. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Los_Angeles





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