Playa Del Rey

Playa Del Rey


Playa Del Rey is Spanish for “Beach of the Kings.” This seaside community, in the city of Los Angeles, was once an area of sand dunes, some measuring 125 feet above sea level. Its hilly terrain is indicative of the ancient dunes, and one of the steepest dunes still and runs along the coast from Playa Del Rey to Palos Verdes to the south. Playa Del Rey is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west, Marina Del Rey to the north, Westchester to the east, and El Segundo to the south. Situated south of Westchester Bluffs, on a flood plain where the LA River drains from the Santa Monica Mountains, Playa Del Rey was once comprised entirely of wetlands. The construction of a concrete channel within the Ballona Creek halted flooding and redirected river runoff to the San Pedro area. Playa Del Rey is the home of the UCLA and LMU crew teams practice facility, in the Ballona Creek Channel.

Locals and visitors from nearby communities use the bridge that connects Ballona Creek and the marina as a biking, walking, and jogging path. It is possible to travel all the way from Santa Monica to the north, down to the South Bay, through Playa Del Rey, via this beachside boardwalk. The Playa Del Rey Lagoon was the first attempt at a dredged harbor, but was flooded during construction. The area is now a public park that offers wildlife viewing and recreation opportunities. Playa Del Rey was a coveted spot for surfers for years, before being disregarded for more desirable locations like Manhattan Beach to the south. Of some concern is the runoff from the treatment plant that sits steps from the main inhabited portion of Playa Del Rey.

Playa Del Rey is comprised of mostly residential real estate, but some businesses exist on Manchester Boulevard, Pershing Drive, and Culver Boulevard. The first neighborhood to be constructed in Playa Del Rey was Del Rey Hills, built out in 1928 and now located in the south part of the city. Playa Del Rey is the last stretch of coastline to be developed by the city of Los Angeles, as the proximity of Los Angeles International Airport made the area an undesirable place to live by many. Some homes have been destroyed or taken over by eminent domain for use by LAX. The population of Playa Del Rey in 2005 was 8,600.

Often called as ‘the last stop before the pacific’, this city has wide, beautiful, sparse beaches, with small sand dunes and volleyball courts, making it a perfect get-away from the crowded beaches. Other attractions are some good restaurants, cafes, stores, a Playa Del Rey Park to visit, and a six-mile bicycle path, commencing from Culver City and ending in Marina Del Rey.




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